alwaysabeautifullife
allthingscatholic:

The name “ladybird" originated in the Middle Ages when the insects were known as the "beetle of Our Lady”. They were named after the Virgin Mary, who in early religious paintings was often shown wearing a red cloak. The spots of the seven spot ladybird were said to symbolise seven joys and seven sorrows. Common names in other European languages have the same association (the German name Marienkäfer translates to “Marybeetle" or ladybeetle). In the USA the name was Americanized to "ladybug".—Ladybird: Etymology
The Seven Sorrows1. The Prophecy of Simeon to Mary over the Infant Jesus (Luke 2:34)”Thy own soul a sword shall pierce.”2. The Flight into Egypt of the Holy Family (Matthew 2:13)3. The Loss of the Child Jesus for Three Days (Luke 2:43)4. The Meeting of Jesus and Mary along the Way of the Cross (Luke 23:26)5. The Crucifixion, where Mary stands at the foot of the cross (John 19:25)6. The Descent from the Cross, where Mary receives the dead body of Jesus in her arms (Matthew 27:57)7. The Burial of Jesus (John 19:40)—Our Lady of Sorrows
The Seven Joys1. The Annunciation2. The Nativity of Jesus3. The Adoration of the Magi4. The Resurrection of Christ5. The Ascension of Christ to Heaven6. The Pentecost or Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and Mary7. The Coronation of the Virgin in Heaven
In the olden days, British farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help with their crops. Then ladybugs arrived and helped the farmers by eating crop-eating bugs and saved farmers’ crops. In honour of these bugs, the farmers called the beetles “Our Lady’s beetle,” which turned into ladybug. —Going Bug-gy! Facts and Fun About Insects

allthingscatholic:

The name “ladybird" originated in the Middle Ages when the insects were known as the "beetle of Our Lady”. They were named after the Virgin Mary, who in early religious paintings was often shown wearing a red cloak. The spots of the seven spot ladybird were said to symbolise seven joys and seven sorrows. Common names in other European languages have the same association (the German name Marienkäfer translates to “Marybeetle" or ladybeetle). In the USA the name was Americanized to "ladybug".
Ladybird: Etymology


The Seven Sorrows
1. The Prophecy of Simeon to Mary over the Infant Jesus (Luke 2:34)
Thy own soul a sword shall pierce.
2. The Flight into Egypt of the Holy Family (Matthew 2:13)
3. The Loss of the Child Jesus for Three Days (Luke 2:43)
4. The Meeting of Jesus and Mary along the Way of the Cross (Luke 23:26)
5. The Crucifixion, where Mary stands at the foot of the cross (John 19:25)
6. The Descent from the Cross, where Mary receives the dead body of Jesus in her arms (Matthew 27:57)
7. The Burial of Jesus (John 19:40)
Our Lady of Sorrows


The Seven Joys
1. The Annunciation
2. The Nativity of Jesus
3. The Adoration of the Magi
4. The Resurrection of Christ
5. The Ascension of Christ to Heaven
6. The Pentecost or Descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and Mary
7. The Coronation of the Virgin in Heaven


In the olden days, British farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help with their crops. Then ladybugs arrived and helped the farmers by eating crop-eating bugs and saved farmers’ crops. In honour of these bugs, the farmers called the beetles “Our Lady’s beetle,” which turned into ladybug. 
Going Bug-gy! Facts and Fun About Insects

paulstead
Several critics have noted that if evangelical atheists (as the philosopher John Gray calls them) are ignorant of religion, as they usually are, then they aren’t truly atheists. ‘The knowledge of contraries is one and the same,’ as Aristotle said. If your idea of God is not one that most theistic traditions would recognize, you’re not talking about God (at most, the New Atheists’ arguments are relevant to the low-hanging god of fundamentalism and deism).
Philip found Nathanael and said to him, “We have found him about whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus son of Joseph from Nazareth.” Nathanael said to him, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip said to him, “Come and see.” When Jesus saw Nathanael coming toward him, he said of him, “Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!” Nathanael asked him, “Where did you get to know me?” Jesus answered, “I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.” Nathanael replied, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.”
Gospel of John
dick-of-saint-vick

magictransistor:

Pages from an Illuminated Gospel. Ethiopia, Highland Region. 1300s.

This illuminated manuscript of the Four Gospels was created in the late fourteenth to early fifteenth century at an Ethiopian monastic center. Its full-page paintings on vellum depict New Testament scenes from the life of Christ and portraits of the evangelists. The text is in Ge’ez, the classical Ethiopian language. Typical of Ethiopian painting, the imagery is two-dimensional and linear. Heads are seen frontally; bodies are often in profile. The artist abbreviated the facial features and treated the human form as a columnar mass, articulated in bold black and red lines.

In the fourth century A.D., the Ethiopian king Ezana converted to Christianity. Christianity became the official religion of the state whose legacy endured in various forms until the twentieth century. Around the time this manuscript was made, Ethiopia’s Christian kingdom expanded its influence. Monastic centers became increasingly important outposts of state power. They were also the chief sites of Christian art production. During the sixteenth century, Islamic incursions devastated the region, and most Christian Ethiopian art that predates the seventeenth century was destroyed. This illuminated gospel is a rare survival. -Met

wesleyhill

But if you allow tragedy to guide you to look beyond the meeting of needs, beyond the temporary scarcities and lacks of life on earth, you see that the irresolution of tragedy imagines a looming surprise.

For the Christian frame, this surprise is salvation, an infinite life in which all needs are perfectly harmonized. Does it mean the tragedies of life are less tragic, less painful? Not at all. But it contextualizes them in such a way as to demonstrate that they shouldn’t be made primary in our ethics. They are not eternal like hope is, but rather incidental. Life has a gap in it: it just does. You can’t resolve it because it’s just the nature of life on earth, but the fact that we must qualify ‘life’ with ‘on earth’ in the context of tragedy means that there is life beyond this one, and it’s toward that end that we orient our ethics. This alone allows us to register our unhappiness and dissatisfaction while still sojourning on.

That’s the conclusion of a very rich post on marriage by Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig. (via wesleyhill)
scottxstephens
Since the branch of philosophy on which we are at present engaged is not, like others, theoretical in its aim - because we are studying not to know what goodness is, but how to become good men, since otherwise it would be useless - we must apply our minds to the problem of how our actions should be performed, because, as we have just said, it is these that actually determine our dispositions.

Aristotle, Ethics, 1103b27-32.

Aristotle on point concerning moral theory and how any attempt at conceiving of morality apart from praxis is useless. Praxis, praxis, praxis. 

(via scottxstephens)